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Teaching

English 1010: Intro to Writing

Development of critical literacies-reading, writing and thinking using methods of knowledge-making. Promotes awareness of rhetorical strategies as they apply to a variety of socio-cultural contexts.

English 1810: Mentoring Writers

Introduces students to the theory, practice, and pedagogy of writing centers and provides practical experience through Service Learning opportunities at local literacy education centers.

English 1900: Independent study (taught as Tutor Education or Mentoring Writers)

See 1810 above.

English 2010: Intermediate Writing

Extends principles of rhetorical awareness and knowledge making introduced in English 1010 and increases the ideological engagement within the classroom. Interrogates socioeconomic and political issues. Course may be taught with a Service Learning component.

English 2100: Technical Writing

Professional writing in technical fields, contextualizing assignments in real-life work situations. Adaptation of writing strategies to cultural, social, and political contexts. Composing of diverse workplace documents.Course may be taught with a Service Learning component. 

English 2300: Intro to Shakespeare

Interpretive strategies for reading Shakespeare. Approach from traditional critical positions, moving to current social cultural and political reinterpretations. Students examine contemporary retellings of the plays.

English 2600: Critical Intro to Literature

Course introduces and analyzes various genres of literature in light of a variety of critical and theoretical approaches.

English 2610:  Diversity in American Literature

Course interrogates historical, political and cultural ideas suggested and sustained within representative American texts, some classic, others newly emerging. Materials include both traditional and popular readings. 

English 2620:  Intro to British Literature

Survey of British authors from medieval to contemporary literature.

Writing 990: College Preparatory Writing

Course interrogates historical, political and cultural ideas suggested and sustained within representative American texts, some classic, others newly emerging. Materials include both traditional and popular readings. 

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